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Manchester Civil Justice Centre

From the exterior, The building of Denton Corker Marshall Architects signals and literally displays the accessibility of the courts. This building is part of the city, and the city part of the building. It provides accommodation of around 34,000m² on 15 levels. It houses 47 courtrooms, 75 consultation rooms, in addition to office and support space.

The working courts and offices are expressed as long rectilinear forms, articulated at each floor level, and projecting at each end of the building as a varied composition of solid and void. In side elevation, these elements collectively establish a dynamic and distinctive building profile; in end elevation, they form a powerful sculptural interplay of light and shade, depth and complexity. The architectural implication is that the courts are not forbidding or concealed, but open and accessible.

The judicial interface is seen as the principal city scale signal of the Civil Justice Centre. The eastern facade will become the memorable ‘sign’ that clearly establishes this as the courts building and unlike any other building in the city.

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